An ACEO for my friend Christine, who wanted bioluminescent deep sea animals w/ big teeth.
Jellyfish are so much fun to draw!

An ACEO for my friend Christine, who wanted bioluminescent deep sea animals w/ big teeth.

Jellyfish are so much fun to draw!

An ACEO request for my friend Cheryl, who wanted “two Notonectidae with spears fighting a Belostomatid (giant water bug)”. She wins Best ACEO Request.
I’m still taking ACEO commissions! $30-$45 depending on the subject/complexity! Note me if you’re interested.

An ACEO request for my friend Cheryl, who wanted “two Notonectidae with spears fighting a Belostomatid (giant water bug)”. She wins Best ACEO Request.

I’m still taking ACEO commissions! $30-$45 depending on the subject/complexity! Note me if you’re interested.

Two Lateral Views of a Cow Skull - 11 x 17” - pen&ink
A couple years ago, my ex gave me this grimy cow skull w/ 2 bullet holes in the forehead. In a fit of curiosity, I decided to cut in half. With a handsaw. At one point during the bisection, my downstairs neighbours banged on their ceiling to politely let me know that I was making too much noise. Oh, if only they had actually come to my door to inquire what all the sawing noise was about…
And then I thought it might be cool to do a stippled drawing of the interior. The end. ;)
Edit: This piece has been selected for inclusion at the Guild of Natural Science Illustrator’s member show at the Colorado University Museum of Natural History in Boulder, from April 25 - Sept 19! :D

Two Lateral Views of a Cow Skull - 11 x 17” - pen&ink

A couple years ago, my ex gave me this grimy cow skull w/ 2 bullet holes in the forehead. In a fit of curiosity, I decided to cut in half. With a handsaw. At one point during the bisection, my downstairs neighbours banged on their ceiling to politely let me know that I was making too much noise. Oh, if only they had actually come to my door to inquire what all the sawing noise was about…

And then I thought it might be cool to do a stippled drawing of the interior. The end. ;)

Edit: This piece has been selected for inclusion at the Guild of Natural Science Illustrator’s member show at the Colorado University Museum of Natural History in Boulder, from April 25 - Sept 19! :D

Cow Skull - Lateral View (Exterior) - 8.5” x 11” - ink
Part 1 of a 2-part project. Next illustration: the interior…

Cow Skull - Lateral View (Exterior) - 8.5” x 11” - ink

Part 1 of a 2-part project. Next illustration: the interior…

Coloured pencil ACEO (2.5” x 3.5”) for my good buddy Kim, of the adorable bat species she is studying for her MSc.
I’m currently taking ACEO commissions! Prices are $35-$45, depending on the complexity and my familiarity with the subject matter. Drop me an Ask if you’re interested!

Coloured pencil ACEO (2.5” x 3.5”) for my good buddy Kim, of the adorable bat species she is studying for her MSc.

I’m currently taking ACEO commissions! Prices are $35-$45, depending on the complexity and my familiarity with the subject matter. Drop me an Ask if you’re interested!

Hibiscus blossoms
Coloured pencil practice
<3

Hibiscus blossoms

Coloured pencil practice

<3

Arctic Unicorn - each 8 x 10” - coloured pencil & acrylic

No love to the scanner!! >:(

Design based on pronghorn, cheetah, caribou, greyhound & horse anatomy. The skeleton and muscular system have a number of subtle non-ungulate adjustments that lend it an alien quality without compromising the familiar silhouette.

Cursorial tundra mammal; no sexual dimorphism; horn grows continuously throughout life; gathers in large breeding/wintering herds but sexes segregate during spring & summer; omnivorous; crepuscular; poor jumper but excellent swimmer; hooves lengthen during late summer/early fall & act as snowshoes; circumpolar distribution; extremely wary of humans.

I want to do a fake taxonomic monograph. Head-canon says they were originally classified as Antilocaprids due to the characteristics of their feet until a complete skull was found…

<3

Midnight is the perfect time to figure out how to piece a large image back together in a new graphics editing program. :/
Dragonfruit 10&#8221; x 14&#8221; coloured pencil &amp; acrylic 2013
For my portfolio.

Midnight is the perfect time to figure out how to piece a large image back together in a new graphics editing program. :/

Dragonfruit 10” x 14” coloured pencil & acrylic 2013

For my portfolio.

Don&#8217;t get me wrong: birds are fascinating, reptiles are spectacular, fish are nifty, &amp; inverts rule the planet; biochemistry, cell biology, genetics &amp; microbiology are all vastly interesting and indispensable, but in the Bio Sci &#8216;hood, mammalogy is my home turf. :)

Don’t get me wrong: birds are fascinating, reptiles are spectacular, fish are nifty, & inverts rule the planet; biochemistry, cell biology, genetics & microbiology are all vastly interesting and indispensable, but in the Bio Sci ‘hood, mammalogy is my home turf. :)

Pronghorns (Antilocapra americana) 8&#8221; x 10&#8221; - Part 1 of a series featuring ungulate species where both the male and female have cranial ornamentation.
Trying out acrylic &amp; coloured pencil together. I like how you can layer colour and get some fine details but I can&#8217;t get it to scan well.
Pronghorns are my favourite ungulate, hands down. They aren&#8217;t deer or antelope; they&#8217;re the lone surviving species from a genus that populated North America before the last Ice Age. They out-lived their cheetah-like predators too, and are now the second fastest terrestrial animal on the planet. Their horns are unique as well: they shed the outer sheath once a year like antlers but retain a bony core year-round.
Next up: caribou!

Pronghorns (Antilocapra americana) 8” x 10” - Part 1 of a series featuring ungulate species where both the male and female have cranial ornamentation.

Trying out acrylic & coloured pencil together. I like how you can layer colour and get some fine details but I can’t get it to scan well.

Pronghorns are my favourite ungulate, hands down. They aren’t deer or antelope; they’re the lone surviving species from a genus that populated North America before the last Ice Age. They out-lived their cheetah-like predators too, and are now the second fastest terrestrial animal on the planet. Their horns are unique as well: they shed the outer sheath once a year like antlers but retain a bony core year-round.

Next up: caribou!